IN THIS ISSUE : MONDAY, MARCH 12, 2012
This Week at the City Bar
Around the Bar
Recent Committee Activity
City Bar in the News
   
This Week at the City Bar
MONDAY, MARCH 12
6 PM – 8:30 PM,
CLE
Ethics in the Empire State: Are You Familiar with the Latest Rules of Professional Conduct?

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM,
Event
Non-Traditional Careers for Attorneys: A Program for Law Students and Recent Law School Graduates



TUESDAY, MARCH 13
1 PM – 3 PM,
Event
International Law on Freedom of Expression and Information: Breakthroughs at the U.N. and Other Significant Developments


6:30 PM – 8 PM,
CLE
Licensing, Naming Rights & Sponsorship Agreements in the Sports & Entertainment Industry



THURSDAY, MARCH 15
8:30 AM – 10:15 AM,
Event/CLE
An Objective Approach to Legal Editing: 2012 Professional Development Workshop Series


6:30 PM – 8:30 PM,
Event
Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds About Animals and Food
Books at the Bar

Around the Bar
Watching the Detectives


Glenn Fine (right), former Inspector General, U.S. Department of Justice, with Scott Horton, Columbia Law School Professor and Harper’s Magazine columnist, at “Watching the Detectives: Oversight of Post 9/11 Law Enforcement Counterterrorism Operations,” a program co-sponsored by the City Bar and the Brennan Center on March 8th.

Pathways to the Bench and Beyond


Justice Doris Gonzalez of the New York State Supreme Court was a moderator at a March 8th program for lawyers interested in becoming judges.

Recent Committee Activity
Federal Consent Decree Fairness Act

The Committee on Civil Rights sent a letter to Congress expressing opposition to the proposed Federal Consent Decree Fairness Act (H.R. 3041), which would allow a state or local government or official to file a motion to modify or vacate a federal consent decree four years after the decree is entered or after the expiration of the term of office of the top state or local official who authorized the consent decree, whichever occurs first. The letter maintains that the proposed legislation will diminish the use of consent decrees to resolve civil rights lawsuits against state and local authorities in the federal courts, undermining the effective enforcement of the federal civil rights laws. Allowing motions to vacate consent decrees based on the mere passage of time or a change in state or local administration, without allegations of a meaningful change in the conduct that the decrees address, will significantly burden the courts and undermine the effectiveness of consent decrees as a tool to effectively resolve disputes.

City Bar in the News
Law Technology News, March 7, 2012

In an article for Law Technology News entitled False Friends: the Ethical Limits of Discovery via Social Media, Jonathan I. Ezor wrote,
“Attorneys may be tempted to try to ‘become friends’ with an opposing party or witness on a service like Facebook and thus gain access to posts and files not available to the general public…Such ‘false friending,’ though, has been rejected as unethical practice by multiple state and local bars…The opinions are often based on the local version of Rules 4.1 (Truthfulness In Statements To Others), 4.2 (Communication With Person Represented By Counsel), and 8.4(c) (prohibiting ‘conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation’) of the Model Rules of Professional Responsibility. Examples of these opinions include…Formal Opinion 2010-2 of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York’s Committee on Professional Ethics.”

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